Log in

Login to your account

Username *
Password *
Remember Me

This week, Seychelles' daily newspaper "Today in Seychelles" spoke to Dr. Nirmal Shah, Nature Seychelles' Chief Executive for its Big Interview. Dr. Shah is a well-known Civil Society leader and change-maker who has 35 years experience working nationally and internationally in various fields including sustainable development, biodiversity conservation, coastal zone management, fisheries, ecotourism, climate change, environmental education, and insect, bird and marine research.

(Seychelles News Agency) - Artisanal fishers from the Indian Ocean countries have gathered in a training session in Seychelles to identify skills needed in co-management, leadership and communication to tackle common challenges.

The three-day training from September 11-13 is being organised by the Federation of Artisanal Fishers of the Indian Ocean (FPAOI) and the Seychelles Fisheries Authority (SFA) at the Coco D'Or Hotel in the northern Mahe district of Beau Vallon.

The chairman of the Federation, Seychellois Keith Andre, told journalists that the fishermen in the region are facing common challenges such as climate change which needs to be dealt with collectively.

“We have found that in our previous training certain countries have surmounted certain challenges that others are still struggling with and we thought that by sharing experiences and knowledge we could find the solution at the doorstep of our neighbours,” said Andre.

He added that by meeting collectively “we have managed to accomplish many great things such as pushing for a resolution to reduce industrial fishing by big operators which is often not sustainable.”

The training, which is also helping with the establishment of a line and track fishery co-management plan, is sponsored by the Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation ACP-EU as ongoing support since 2017.

path 9246

The three-day training is being organised by the Federation of Artisanal Fishers of the Indian Ocean (FPAOI) and the Seychelles Fisheries Authority. (Joena Meme) Photo License: CC-BY

Apart from climate change, Andre said that the Blue Economy concept is also a threat to fishermen.

“All of a sudden everybody wants a chunk of the ocean and it is being done at the expense of the fishermen. In the name of protection, everybody wants the fishermen out to protect the reef. This is why we are providing training in co-management and leadership as the right management system can allow our profession to co-exist with other activities,” he said.

Fisheries is the second top contributor to the economy of Seychelles, a group of 115 islands in the western Indian Ocean.

The chairperson of the Seychelles’ Roche Caiman Fisherman Association, Florant Tirant, told SNA that the training has taught him that fishing is not only about going out to sea to fish and then sell what you have caught.

“There is more to it than that. I have been taught that with the right management skills I can move from being a small fisherman to one who is now capable of managing my boat, finance as well as leading and mentoring other fishermen through an association,” said Tirant.

The training is also focusing on building the knowledge of fishermen and their negotiating skills and are providing success stories to encourage others to take up this noble profession.

 

Consumers are being urged to boycott yellowfin tuna from the Indian Ocean, including that originating from Seychelles, because of unsustainable fishing by the European Union fleet. A Report by Blue Marine Foundation warns that catches continue to rise despite warnings from the Indian Ocean Tuna Commission's (IOTC) scientists that they would have to be cut by 20% to give the stock a 50-50 chance of recovering by 2024.

Climate change has taken a significant toll on many of the world's fisheries, and overfishing has magnified the problem, according to a new paper. Ocean warming led to an estimated 4.1% drop in sustainable catches, on average, for many species of fish and shellfish from 1930 to 2010.

(Seychelles News Agency) - The Seychelles' Department of Foreign Affairs said on Monday that it is providing consular assistance to four Seychellois men being detained at a prison in Mozambique on charges of illegally fishing in Mozambican waters.

Two months ago, a Malagasy association signed a 10-year, $2.7 billion fishing deal with a group of Chinese companies to send 330 fishing vessels to Madagascar. The Agence Malagasy de Développement économique et de Promotion d’entreprises (AMDP) made the deal, which it says was designed to promote the country’s “blue economy.” It did so without consulting the fisheries ministry, the national environment office, civil society groups, or local fishers, who are already struggling with foreign competition for Madagascar’s dwindling marine stocks. Many of these are now calling for the deal to be scrapped. The critics say the AMDP failed to set up an open bidding process and did not conduct an environmental impact assessment or any public consultation. No draft of the deal has been made public.
More on Mongabay

Dr. Nirmal Shah. Environment In Seychelles

Dr. Shah sounds the alarm on distant water fishing nations attempting, what some have called, a new form of colonisation by claiming that 85 per cent of all future tuna catch in our exclusive economic zone should be theirs based on their history of fishing in our waters. He led the Seychelles delegation, which included private sector representatives, to the 22nd Indian Ocean Tuna Commission session last month, and has been fighting hard ever since. “The government has taken the right, and brave, stand, in my opinion, but I would also like the Seychelles public to understand the dire situation here,” he stresses in this interview.

I congratulate the Praslin fishermen in particular the Praslin Fishers Association (PFA) for the finalization of the Praslin coastal fishery plan. The plan is now awaiting approval by the Cabinet of Ministers before it can be implemented according to the Seychelles News Agency (http://www.seychellesnewsagency.com/articles/897#sthash.TyD1fvSa.dpuf)

“When I was growing up, I remember a lot of fishermen fishing outside Port Victoria, near what we used to call ‘The Far’. The Light House. In those days there were spawning aggregations of groupers every April. Fishermen knew to fish there for a big catch. This spawning site vanished even before the land reclamation because of overfishing.” Dr Shah, Nature Seychelles CEO said in introducing a workshop presentation on conventional and acoustic tagging of herbivorous fish.

P. Mawanda, TODAY Newspaper, 5 May 2015: The country’s move to establish the Blue Economy may remain a pipedream if issues such as illegal fishing are not addressed. But are the authorities adequately armed to deal with the situation?

Page 1 of 2

Find us

 

Click on the map for directions to the Blue Economy Knowledge Centre

Get in touch

Blue Economy Knowledge Center

The Center for Environment & Education

P.O.Box 1310, Victoria, Seychelles.

Phone: +(248) 460-1100

Email: blueeconomy@seychelles.net