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Doing population controls of coral predators to assist recovery on reefs impacted by the 2016 mass coral bleaching event. A total of 790 corallivore snails (Drupella spp.) were removed from the Reef Rescuers transplanted site in Cousin Island Special reserve.

Another 28 corallivore starfishes (Crown-of-Thorns) were injected with lethal doses of vinegar on the resilient reef of Trompeuse.

by Louise Malaisé, Technical & Scientific Officer, Reef Rescuers

Scarring and sheeting of nursery grown corals are among the first steps towards successful rearing. The scaring process - depending on the growth structure and type of coral - can take anywhere from two weeks to a month and a half.

TODAY NEWSPAPER; 6th October 2016; N. Tirant:

Two years after the announcement that it would be made a protected nature reserve under the Nature Parks and Conservancy Act, the island group of D’Arros, situated 250km from Mahé in Seychelles’ outer islands, is back in the environmental limelight. And this time, the public wants to be heard on the second attempt to turn the group into a “special reserve” that could affect livelihoods.

Recent emotive statements by politicians vying for the post of President in both the United States and Seychelles made me realize that no matter how different the Presidential races may be between these two countries, there are indeed some important similarities. At least one topic has produced similar pronouncements from several candidates in both countries. Economic inequality or the personal earning gap has spawned a blame game, but no realistic economic solution. I believe this is because economic inequality is not only a fact in both countries but is also a complex phenomenon which is not very well understood.

Good news for the reefs of Seychelles! Over 1,000 super coral nubbins are happily growing in the Reef Rescuer coral nursery.

PRESS RELEASE: IUCN joins effort to align ecotourism with conservation goals

September 12, 2016 - Honolulu, Hawaii -- Among the landmark decisions emerging last week from the 2016 International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) World Conservation Congress is a bold decision to improve standards for ecotourism worldwide. Motion 65 (now Resolution 60), “Improving standards in ecotourism”, proposed by the Yale Tropical Resources Institute in collaboration with The International Ecotourism Society, Nature Seychelles, the African Wildlife Foundation, the WILD Foundation, The Wilderness Society Australia, National Parks Australia Council, the Global Sustainable Tourism Council, and the Moroccan Association for Ecotourism and Nature Protection, urges IUCN to renew their definition of ecotourism and address the barriers to its effectiveness as a conservation tool.

Statement by Dr. Nirmal Jivan Shah in the Plenary session of Our Ocean Conference, Friday 16 September, U.S. State Dept., Washington D.C. USA

Two months ago in July the U.S. Science Envoy for the Ocean Dr. Jane Lubchenco partnered with the State Department, U.S. National Academy of Sciences, the African Academies of Science, the African National Young Academies, The World Academy of Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Global Young Academy to host a high level, scientific roundtable in Mauritius entitled “Advancing Ocean Sciences in Africa.”

In a recently published study by researchers from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama and McGill University, eating sea turtle eggs could be greatly detrimental to human health owing to the high presence of heavy metals in the eggs. Great news for sea turtles and conservationists protecting these species, but not so for the people of Panama.
Like Cousin Island Special Reserve which is managed by Nature Seychelles, many nature reserves protected under law provide a safe haven for many marine and terrestrial wildlife from human activities such as fishing, poaching, development, pollution and so forth.

After the devastating effects of the recent bleaching event on our coral reefs, the time has come to look for survivors and get on the road of recovery.

After two underwater heat waves in 1998 and 2010, El Niño has once again struck coral reefs worldwide, triggering the third global coral bleaching event in recorded history.

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Blue Economy Knowledge Center

The Center for Environment & Education

P.O.Box 1310, Victoria, Seychelles.

Phone: +(248) 460-1100

Email: blueeconomy@seychelles.net